Technology Awards

MINEX III Compliance and previous MINEX evaluations

In 2015 MegaMatcher SDK fingerprint technology was one of the first to successfully pass the recently established MINEX III NIST third-party evaluation, demonstrating its compliance with the state of the art standards as well as its interoperability with other vendors' biometric software. In 2016 MegaMatcher on Card SDK fingerprint matching algorithm for smart cards also successfully passed MINEX III evaluation. Our comments on MINEX III participation contain more details about the results.

In 2014 MegaMatcher SDK fingerprint technology was recognized by the NIST as fully MINEX compliant and placed second in the Ongoing MINEX ranking for fingerprint matching algorithms.

In 2007 previous version of MegaMatcher SDK was one of the several algorithms worldwide recognized as fully MINEX compliant for both fingerprint template encoding and matching.


FpVTE 2012 and FpVTE 2003 (the Fingerprint Vendor Technology Evaluations)

In 2015 Neurotechnology's fingerprint identification algorithms have been judged by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) as one of the fastest and most accurate among the participants. Our comments on FpVTE 2012 participation contain details about the results in each category.

Previously, Neurotechnology participated in FpVTE 2003 under the name Neurotechnologija and showed one of the best reliability results in the Middle Scale Test. See the FpVTE 2003 web site for a detailed report of the evaluation results.


IREX IV, IREX III and IREX Evaluations

In 2013 Neurotechnology's iris recognition algorithm has been judged by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) as one of the fastest and most accurate among the participants. Our comments on IREX IV participation contain more details about the results.

Previously, Neurotechnology showed perfect results in the IREX and IREX III evaluations.


WSQ 3.1 Certification

In 2011 FBI certified Neurotechnology's implementation of WSQ image format support. Certificates and additional information are available.


PFT II (Proprietary Fingerprint Template) Evaluation

In 2015 Neurotechnology fingerprint algorithm was submitted to NIST Proprietary Fingerprint Template Evaluation II. The algorithm's template matching accuracy was in top 4 among other participants in most of the experiments. See our comment for more information.


FVC2006, FVC2004, FVC2002 and FVC2000 results

Neurotechnology participated in the Fingerprint Verification Competition several times and won numerous medals for reliability and performance. See the FVC2006 participation results, as well as FVC2004, FVC2002 and FVC2000 results for more information.


Comments on competition results

The FpVTE protocol was strict and did not allow use of some of our advanced algorithm features, which, in a real world application, would further increase the recognition quality. Particularly, the MST set contained images from different scanners, but each particular image scanner model was not disclosed. In a real world scenario, specific parameters would be set for each specific scanner type. This would allow the algorithm to perform at an even higher accuracy level.

Another such real world example that was not simulated in the FpVTE protocol is the ability to generate globalized or generalized features templates by capturing several images from the same finger and combining the templates into a single features set. Using a generalized features set can significantly improve the algorithm's reliability and produces improved matching scores. In the FpVTE MST set such a method could not be used, as only two matched fingerprints were allowed for consideration.

The FVC protocol is very useful for comparing different vendors' algorithms, however it only allows comparison of verification (1-to-1 matching) but not identification (1-to-many matching) results. One of the strongest capabilities of Neurotechnology's algorithms is fast, reliable identification, therefore a 1-to-many test would better reflect our real algorithm ranking among the participants.

FVC uses databases that are not from real applications (more information), but rather uses fingerprint sets which had been specially collected for the competition (some with certain distortion or noises highlighted). In this way, various distortion and noise statistics of the fingerprints did not correspond to real world application statistics, and vendors' results may be not completely adequate to apply to real life situations.

Like the FpVTE, the FVC did not allow us to generate globalized or generalized features templates by capturing several images from the same finger and combining the templates into a single features set. Using a generalized feature set can significantly improve the algorithm's reliability and produces improved matching scores. In the FVC such a method could not be used, as information from only two matched fingerprints was allowed for consideration.